PHDINN908 Innovation and Sustainable Transition

Course description for academic year 2019/2020

Due to Covid-19, changes may occur in course descriptions for the spring semester of 2020. Changes in each course will be published on Canvas. When a course description has been changed on Canvas, the description on web is no longer valid. Examples of such changes could be accomplishment of practice, course type, or whether letter grades or passed/not passed will be used as grading scales.

Contents and structure

The course is based on a sociotechnical systems approach and is rooted in transition theories. During the course students participate in plenary sessions with lectures from internationally leading scholars in this field, smaller group sessions where they present and receive feedback on their own work, and contribute to the discussion of their peer students work. The plenary sessions will include questions and dialogue and there will be good opportunities for informal discussions among participants and faculty.

The course consists of six modules.

Module 1 – Introduction to Innovation and Sustainability Transitions

Module 2 – Technological Innovation Systems: analytical framework, critical choices and key challenges

Module 3 – Sustainability Transitions and Incumbents – Opening the Black box of the Firm

Module 4 - Globalization and Sustainability Transitions

Module 5 - Urban and Regional Sustainability Transitions

Module 6 - Sustainable Development: imperatives, norms, concepts and numbers

The modules will be held from 8th of June to 12th of June

Learning Outcome

The course offers an introduction to the topic of innovation and sustainability transitions. Students will become familiar with the foundations of transitions research, its main conceptual and analytical frameworks as well as with current debates and knowledge gaps in the field of sustainability transitions. The course is designed to provide students with an opportunity to become familiar with different aspects of transitions research and to discuss this in relation to their own research projects.

Upon completion of the course, the candidate:

Knowledge

  • will have knowledge of how to interpret and operationalise the concept of sustainability at different geographical scales and sectors and its imperatives for development;
  • will have advanced knowledge on transition pathways to foster sustainable modes of production and consumption in different societal sectors;
  • will be able to understand, operationalize and critically reflect on the main conceptual frameworks in transition theory, notably Technological Innovation Systems (TIS), the Multi Level Perspective on socio-technical transitions (MLP), Strategic Niche Management (SNM) and Transition Management (TM);
  • Will be able to understand and analyse the role of firms and industrial dynamics in sustainability transitions;
  • will be familiar with the spatialities of sustainability transitions and how geography influences such processes;
  • can contribute to the development of new interdisciplinary and cross-sectoral knowledge, theories, methods and their interpretations.

Skills

  • will understand and be able to explain the resource potential, technical properties, socio-economic challenges, and environmental impacts of future key technologies and solutions for sustainable development;
  • will be able to synthesize material from a broad range of relevant areas in addressing specific questions about the challenges of innovation in sustainability transitions;
  • can independently design research projects targeting a multifaceted evaluation of a prospective green technology or solution;
  • will be able to apply conceptual and theoretical arguments in discussion of the transition of industrial and societal systems and the geographical dimensions of such changes;

General competence

  • will understand the major topics, facts and issues related to sustainability transitions with respect to political, societal, and technological prospects and limitations, environmental considerations, as well as societal effects;
  • will have developed the skills needed to undertake independent research;
  • will be able to contribute with and reflect on new ideas that foster societal change towards a sustainable future; and
  • will be able to disseminate, articulate and discuss his/her own comprehensive, independent research, and utilize relevant scientific theory, concepts and terminology.

Entry requirements

None

Recommended previous knowledge

None

Teaching methods

  • Lectures
  • Student presentations (incl. Q&A) at the end of the course week that outlines the initial idea for the course paper.
  • Writing of a short research paper (<5,000 words) for an international conference.

Assessment

The research paper is graded pass/fail by an internal committee.